Surgical Instructions

After Exposure of an Impacted Tooth

Do not disturb the wound. If surgical packing was placed, leave it alone. The pack helps to keep the tooth exposed. If it gets dislodged or falls out, do not get alarmed.

Bleeding

Some bleeding or redness in the saliva is normal for 24 hours. Excessive bleeding which results in your mouth filling rapidly with blood can frequently be controlled by biting with pressure on a gauze pad placed directly on the bleeding wound for 30 minutes. If bleeding continues, please call for further instructions.

Swelling

Swelling is a normal occurrence after surgery. To minimize swelling, apply an ice bag or a plastic bag or towel filled with ice cubes on the cheek in the area of surgery. Apply the ice continuously as much as possible for the first 36 hours.

Diet

Drink plenty of fluids. Avoid hot liquids or hot foods. Soft food and liquids should be eaten on the day of surgery. Return to a normal diet as soon as possible unless otherwise directed.

Pain

You should begin taking pain medication as soon as you feel the local anesthetic wearing off. For moderate pain, 1 or 2 Tylenol or Extra Strength. Tylenol may be taken every 3-4 hours. Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) may be taken instead of Tylenol. Ibuprofen bought over the counter comes in 200 mg tablets: 2-3 tablets may be taken every 3-4 hours as needed for pain. For severe pain, the prescribed medication should be taken as directed.

Do not take any of the above medications if you are allergic or have been instructed by your doctor not to take it.

Oral Hygiene

Mouth cleanliness is essential to good healing. Clean your mouth thoroughly after each meal beginning the day after surgery. Brush your teeth as best you can. Rinse with warm salt water (1/2 teaspoon of salt in a cup of warm water) six times a day. Continue this procedure until healing is complete.

REMEMBER: A clean wound heals better and faster.

Activity

Keep physical activities to a minimum immediately following surgery. If you are considering exercise, throbbing or bleeding may occur. If this occurs, you should discontinue exercising. Be aware that your normal nourishment intake is reduced. Exercise may weaken you. If you get light headed, stop exercising.

After Tooth Extraction

After tooth extraction, itís important for a blood clot to form to stop the bleeding and begin the healing process. Thatís why we ask you to bite on a gauze pad for 30-45 minutes after the appointment. If the bleeding or oozing still persists, place another gauze pad and bite firmly for another 30 minutes. You may have to do this several times.

After the blood clot forms, it is important not to disturb or dislodge the clot as it aids healing. Do not rinse vigorously, suck on straws, smoke, drink alcohol or brush teeth next to the extraction site for 72 hours. These activities will dislodge or dissolve the clot and retard the healing process. Limit vigorous exercise for the next 24 hours as this will increase blood pressure and may cause more bleeding from the extraction site.

After the tooth is extracted you may feel some pain and experience some swelling. An ice pack or an unopened bag of frozen peas or corn applied to the area will keep swelling to a minimum. Take pain medications as prescribed. The swelling usually subsides after 48 hours.

Use the pain medication as directed. Call the office if the medication doesnít seem to be working. If antibiotics are prescribed, continue to take them for the indicated length of time, even if signs and symptoms of infection are gone. Drink lots of fluids and eat nutritious soft food on the day of the extraction. You can eat normally as soon as you are comfortable.

It is important to resume your normal dental routine after 24 hours. This should include brushing and flossing your teeth at least once a day. This will speed healing and help keep your mouth fresh and clean.

After a few days you will feel fine and can resume your normal activities.

If you have heavy bleeding, severe pain, continued swelling for 2-3 days, or a reaction to the medication, call our office immediately at 858.484.6418.

Home Care Information

Surgical Instructions Section


Dr. Kuklok
San Diego
Oral Surgeon

Kierian B. Kuklok, M.D., D.D.S., is Board Certified by the American Board of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery.  Dr. Kuklok received his medical degree from Georgetown University and his doctorate degree in dentistry from the University of Minnesota.  He completed his Residency in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio where he also received extensive training in the field of cosmetic facial surgery.  A Navy veteran, Dr. Kuklok has been in private practice in the San Diego area since 1999.


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at our San Diego office

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Designed and built with your comfort and safety in mind, Carmel Mountain Oral & Facial Surgery first opened in October of 2004. Digital imaging and x-ray systems and an electronic medical record are just a few of the innovation technologies used in our state of the art office.


9912 A CARMEL MOUNTAIN ROAD
SAN DIEGO, CA 92129

858.484.6418
FAX 858.484.6318

email: info@cmsurgery.com



Carmel Mountain Oral & Facial Surgery - 9912 A Carmel Mountain Road, San Diego, CA 92129 - 858.484.6418 - info@cmsurgery.com



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